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HK iron on covering

Old 04-04-2015, 06:22 AM
  #1  
aeronca52
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Default HK iron on covering

Anybody here use the HK iron on covering at all? It looks nice, and much cheaper than the competition at 5 meter long rolls.
I am looking at the transparent red, but in the web picture it looks more pinkish, I know that is just a picture but are the colors true?

Anyone?

JIm
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Old 04-04-2015, 07:03 AM
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birdDog
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One concern would be the weight per square foot or yard. Microlite and solarfilm come in at like .6 oz per square yard. Monocote is .6-.7oz per square FOOT.

This stuff may be very heavy for electric use and my biggest concern would be the shrink. Some of the heavier coverings have been known to crush electric airframes.

Here's RCG link. http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2194203

of note "Basically, it's very, very nice and (IMO) is as good as any film covering out there. With one important exception: it doesn't seem to know when to stop shrinking, so it can't be used on delicate structures. But in the right application, it's superb. "
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Old 04-04-2015, 09:58 AM
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solentlife
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I use it for wood and foam models.... as cell as my composite wood / foam jobs.

Yes its heavier than Solarfilm. Yes it needs care when shrinking to not warp structure.

Which do I prefer ? Solarfilm every day - but price and availability is preventative for me and HK film is therefore used by me.

Nigel
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Old 04-04-2015, 03:20 PM
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aeronca52
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Thanks for the input guys,
This will be used on a 7 foot oldtimer, a Red Ripper, mostly 1/4 square structure so it should be strong enough.

The chief determining factor here is $$, I was either going with Monocote or HK film and am leaning heavily to the HK, as I should be able to do the entire model with one $13 roll.

As an aside, where does anybody buy Solarfilm?

Jim
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Old 04-04-2015, 04:47 PM
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Here is where I head to.
http://www.mountainmodels.com/produc...78cf1e3528c30c

Yep, sounds like you have a sturdy enough plane, that's for sure.
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Old 04-04-2015, 05:18 PM
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solentlife
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Heres my little Mini 4 (half size WOT4 rendition). 710mm span.

You can see by my holding it how small it is :



Here's her all finished ready to fly :



Now as to structure : The fuselage is 6mm Depron with no wood except to carry motor mount, wing bolt and main legs.



Wing is fully built up with foam ribs and pine strip spar. Ailerons / tail parts etc. are all plain 6mm depron.



3mm Depron sheet over :



Then all covered in standard HK white Iron Film. Only action to be careful on - is use MINMUM heat to avoid damage to underlying foam.

Nigel
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Old 04-04-2015, 06:42 PM
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aeronca52
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Wow, that is one unique way to make a wing!

You mention the ribs are foam, then covered with depron. Are you using the words 'foam' and 'depron' interchangeably, or are they different materials?
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Old 04-04-2015, 07:37 PM
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solentlife
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Originally Posted by aeronca52 View Post
Wow, that is one unique way to make a wing!

You mention the ribs are foam, then covered with depron. Are you using the words 'foam' and 'depron' interchangeably, or are they different materials?
I have two basic foams .... Green underfloor insulation that is stiffer but more brittle than Depron. Makes excellent ribs. For general build though Depron is better as it will absorb stress much better.






But on thinking about it - this model I did use Depron for the ribs !!

This model - another wood / foam combo uses the green for ribs, Qbee :



Here's a model made nearly all in green Floor insulation :





No covering though - cosmetics by Household water based emulsion paint. Vinyl stickers from local Decal Maker Shop ...

Sorry about the confusion !! Getting old !

Nigel
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Old 04-04-2015, 07:44 PM
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Here's one I covered with the HK stuff. Byron Christen Eagle 1/4 scale foamy. Weighs around 20 lbs. and flies better as electric than it did with a Quadra 52. One nice thing about the HK covering is it is a low heat covering, otherwise I wouldn't have been able to use it. Stretches and shrinks with heat excellently, very controllably.
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Old 04-04-2015, 07:54 PM
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aeronca52
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Thanks for the ongoing input, guys.
I forgot to mention the Red Ripper has a very undercambered airfoil, similar to the Grant X-10. Guess that shouldn't be any more difficult to cover than with any of the other iron-ons. But the fuselage is very square so that should make up for the difference!

NIgel & Gord, some might nice models and thinking there!
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Old 04-04-2015, 08:25 PM
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On undercambered wings - it was usually recc'd to apply Balsaloc to ribs to make sure film adhered to the ribs and didn't shrink and pull away creating a flat bottom ...

Nigel
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Old 04-04-2015, 09:07 PM
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And when you heatshrink keep your heatgun or iron away from the ribs. after they're tacked down.
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Old 04-05-2015, 04:45 AM
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Bill G
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Originally Posted by birdDog View Post
One concern would be the weight per square foot or yard. Microlite and solarfilm come in at like .6 oz per square yard. Monocote is .6-.7oz per square FOOT.

This stuff may be very heavy for electric use and my biggest concern would be the shrink. Some of the heavier coverings have been known to crush electric airframes.

Here's RCG link. http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2194203

of note "Basically, it's very, very nice and (IMO) is as good as any film covering out there. With one important exception: it doesn't seem to know when to stop shrinking, so it can't be used on delicate structures. But in the right application, it's superb. "
The weight does matter. I have 2 Sterling P26 Peashooters. The sheeted one with Microlite is 12oz AUW with no ballast, far lighter than the non sheeted one with Monokote and ballast. I've been using Microlite for most everything under 3' span for some time now. Unless a model is large enough and a heavier covering has a color I really want, I have a really hard time talking myself into the added weight.
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Old 04-07-2015, 07:36 PM
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What part of the P-26 is sheeted, Bill? The whold airframe of just part?
Hard to believe the sheeting weighs less than Monokote.
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Old 04-08-2015, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by aeronca52 View Post
What part of the P-26 is sheeted, Bill? The whold airframe of just part?
Hard to believe the sheeting weighs less than Monokote.
I think the magic word here is "ballast" ? Depends where its needed to balance out the model.

Nigel
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Old 04-08-2015, 08:43 PM
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aeronca52
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Oops, thanks NIgel, I missed the magic word, 'ballast'
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:57 AM
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Bill G
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Originally Posted by aeronca52 View Post
What part of the P-26 is sheeted, Bill? The whold airframe of just part?
Hard to believe the sheeting weighs less than Monokote.
No statement was made about sheeting weighing less than Monokote.
My other non-sheeted P26 with Monokote is heavier than this model however, as stated. Eliminating ballast is another contributor to lighter weight, as stated.
The entire fuselage is 1/32" sheeted. A light grade of 1/32" sheet does not add much weight. Around 10-12gms is reasonable for a fuselage like the Sterling P26.

Lightening works in progression, as well as everything working together. If you minimize aft weight, then you can eliminate ballast, also requiring a lighter battery. Installing tail servos as far forward as possible is another contributor. Given the sum weight loss, a lighter motor will now provide ample power and nose weight required. There are other things that matter more than some think, such as using hinge material versus Dubro pin hinges on the stab and/or rudder. I like pin hinges, but I don't like the weight.
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Old 04-13-2015, 08:08 AM
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Eddy
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ChinaCoat is good stuff ! I have used it Red, Blue, Camo, and Yellow, and the shrink rate is always the same, very predictable. Luv it
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Old 04-13-2015, 08:12 AM
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aeronca52
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Thanks for that, Eddy.
From all the positive recommendations I think I will go with it for this model.

BTW have you used any transparent? I was wondering if it has the same transparency as MK or if it had less or more color to it.
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